Hold onto your hats! This work by Turkish composer and pianist Fazil Say is no easy listen. It’s unique, original, texturally dense, and features some heavy theremin! Wrestling with the following four questions, the piece’s inspiration is far from light-hearted: 1) What was there before the Big Bang — space, clouds of dust? 2) The universe is expanding, but in what direction and towards what? 3) Are there other lives in the universe and throughout the galaxies? 4) Is there a God?

Martin is a composer, producer, and bassist with his hands in a huge variety of musical projects. He’s produced music for acclaimed podcasts such as This American Life, Limetown, and The Spark, and written for various artists and production houses. He’s recorded and performed all over the world with acts such as VÉRITÉ, the PLS.trio, Arthur Moon, Emel Mathlouthi, and other NYC-based artists, and produces original electro and house music and remixes as MDFX, and trap/jungle/bass music and remixes as WNNR. He’s also written lots of the music featured in Soundfly videos!

The tritone is a mainstay interval of heavy, dissonant rock riffage. In a most classic example, Black Sabbath’s self-titled song “Black Sabbath” (off the self-titled record, Black Sabbath) hits us with this massively dissonant tritone as soon as the band enters at 0:36, first jumping an octave before descending a gnarly diminished fifth, aiming to invoke the unequivocal power of the devil. The first time features a fast trill on the guitar, with a cleaner example of the interval at 0:47.

Early 2000s rappers

On Flypaper and our social media channels, we’ll be sharing relevant posts that we’ve published over the years that shed light on various aspects of home recording, such as what I mentioned above. You can read some of these via the Home Recording Week tag and by following us on Facebook.

By now, your vocal should be sounding great — nice and punchy with just the right frequency balance and the perfect amount of space. But people have short attention spans these days, so you’ve got to shake things up if you want to keep them interested for three whole minutes.

So when I found out there was a whole online culture of playlists for doggy consumption waiting for me out there on the internet, I was pretty stoked. I mean, I live for this stuff. Anything to make my dog’s life better, right?

Often I find myself using practice to shut my mind off and escape my day-to-day concerns. Playing becomes meditative. And there’s absolutely no way I’m going to stop doing this — it’s part of why I play music. Back off, Ericsson!

You can even take this a step further and cross-reference your streaming metrics with your Next Big Sound analytics to discover some really powerful insights about your audience and understand which efforts are feeding into one another.

Hardest rappers 2018

Let’s get a little more serious now. Finnish composer Kaveli Aho’s concerto for solo theremin and chamber orchestra (recording released in 2014, piece written a few years earlier), performed here by theremin all-star Carolina Eyck is an eight-part homage to Lapland, the most northerly region of Finland. Based on the eight-season division of the year, which is traditional for Lapland’s native Sami people, this work is dense with expressionistic harmony and icy, shimmering textures. It’s great, too, to hear the theremin being explored in all its range — often we only hear the middle and higher registers. In this piece, there are moments when the theremin takes on the sounds of other instruments, like the Chinese erhu or the viola, but also moments when it flutters like a bird. This piece is a real treat and a welcome introduction to the expansive oeuvre of Kaveli Aho.

If you’d like to work with any of these artists specifically, just let us know via this form. We’re happy to connect you with a mentor for a phone call before you make any commitments to the program. Take a free preview to learn more about how the program works, or to be matched with a mentor right away.

In order to do so, we must rely on what we said before — moving fret by fret towards the body of the guitar will give us sharps (♯). On the 6th string, for example, we will get: E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E), and then moving back towards the open strings we’ll get flats (♭), producing: E, E♭, D, D♭, C, B, B♭, A, A♭, G, G♭, F, E.

Saying goodbye to big purchases can be tough. But if it’s not actively contributing to your music, that money might be better spent elsewhere. Think about what you actually need for your workflow.

Self-described as “an inventory of cross-disciplinary interestingness, spanning art, science, design, history, philosophy, and more,” Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings explores many different genres and ideas with multiple sources that can help you find something to be inspired by. Typically their posts will start with a quote, or a literary thought experiment, and dive deep into the stories or moments that inspired them.