Content-makers often inquire about my services or how they can create a podcast themselves. Most podcasts, however, tend to be personal passion projects and ultimately don’t have the budget for a professional studio to record and edit each episode. So hosts or producers will turn to YouTube, friends, and family to educate them on how to create their content, and this is where a lot of people struggle. Let’s dig in.

I’d hesitate to call Hiroshi Yoshimura’s Music for Nine Post Cards a lost treasure, as this record has very much been sought after since its initial release. Yoshimura composed this music while watching the scenery outside the window change; clouds passing, sunlight flickering, and leaves moving in the wind. He recorded it and offered it to a contemporary museum in Tokyo to be played next to the window overlooking their courtyard. After some time, Satoshi Ashikawa (see below) started his label and the resulting “Wave Notation” series, to publish this ambient masterpiece after museumgoers started calling to ask where they could buy it.

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional support and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! That means you’re not just getting the course content, but a coach who’s invested in your success. With writing-focused courses like The New Songwriter’s Workshop, Unlocking the Emotional Power of Chords, and Songwriting for Producers, there’s nothing you won’t improve after a session with Soundfly!

Vh1 save the music gala

Natural overdrive can sound amazing in a punk song, so if you’re getting a tube amp don’t forget to crank the drive to see how you like the sound it produces. Otherwise, stick to pedals, and look for something big and tough enough to handle your tone (and the mosh pits). Here are some of my favorite choices for punk musicians:

For example, if you are a solo performer singing along to tracks and all you bring on stage is your phone or iPod, you’re focusing all the attention on yourself as a performer. If you choreograph dance moves, or play into this isolated, “artist in the spotlight” vibe, perfect. But if you’re only doing this because you haven’t yet figured out how to play this music live, it’s a mistake to get up there in the first place. People look at that stuff, believe me.

The album spent 66 weeks on the Billboard Top Pop Album charts, peaking at #2. It was a smash hit that elevated James Brown to household name status all over America.

The nearly 11-minute version of “Lost Someone” is a high point; Brown demonstrates his ability to ensconce his sexuality in a preacher’s cloak. Throughout this song, it feels like he’s beseeching the audience to believe in a higher power. Judging by the screams of the audience, I’d say he converted all of them. This style of performance would later go on to be emulated by other larger-than-life performers such as Prince or Bruce Springsteen.

Famed for her 2014 opera Harriet Tubman: When I Crossed that Line to Freedom, Dr. Nkeiru Okoye’s music has been described as “emotionally charged and musically sublime.” Okoye also cites inspiration from a dizzying range of influences including Gilbert and Sullivan, Gershwin, Sondheim, Copland, gospel, jazz and yes, even Schoenberg. Born and raised in New York, the composer studied piano at the Manhattan School of Music Preparatory Division and later at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music where she completed degrees in Music Theory and Composition. Okoye later went onto complete her PhD at Rutgers University. Her varied and well-crafted music sits nicely in a diatonic framework, making it easily accessible and highly enjoyable for a range of audiences. With music as captivating and loud as her recent opera, I believe we’ll be hearing a great deal from Dr. Nkeiru Okoye.

Donate musical instruments to charity

For a particularly clean and easy-to-follow rendition of this section, check out this video, which follows the full orchestral score through the Act II interlude.

And all of this happened before Brown’s future mega hits like “Sex Machine,” “Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag,” and “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World” were even conceived. Live at the Apollo paved the way for Brown’s later successes, it was a jumping off point to reaching the black audiences and households to whom he really wanted to communicate. At this point, Brown was playing around 300 shows a year but was still mostly known by black audiences.

I mostly approached this as “soloing” with the a cappella, using the instrumental as my “rhythm section.” But I did some improvising with the instrumental too, by looping, and by jumping around between cue points. I don’t consider this to be a polished work of art or anything, but I discovered some pretty cool sounds, even at my basic skill level. So I’m excited to see where this leads.

Hi [band/manager name],

The type of sample or synth you use will also determine how you shape the line. When you compose, focus more on getting the right feeling than on being harmonically “correct.” Instead of aiming for complex note choices, experiment with your sound choices and maybe try some distortion so things sound grittier.